The Wallace Collection

The Wallace Collection, A Family Collection, A National Museum, An International Treasure House
Possibly vase 'à feilles d'acante' or 'à anses tire-bouchon', of the second size
  • Vase and cover
  • Possibly vase 'à feilles d'acante' or 'à anses tire-bouchon', of the second size
  • Manufacture de Sèvres
  • Sèvres, France
  • c. 1763 - 1765
  • Soft-paste porcelain, gilded
  • Object size: 13.4 x 22.9 cm
  • Incised mark: A scrolling 'C.D'
    Incised mark: An indecipherable mark, possibly '&'
  • C259
  • Back State Room
Commentary
History
Images & Media
Further Reading
  • Pot-pourri vases were a popular way in the eighteenth century to scent the rooms of its noble owner. This wonderfully sumptuous model derives its name from the sculptural myrtle branches on the sides and the painted decoration on the foot. The myrtle theme may allude to specific pot-pourri mixtures that contained dried leaves and blossoms from the plant.
    Created by chief designer Jean-Claude Duplessis père, the model takes up the silhouette of an earlier creation, the vase 'pot-pourri Hébert' (see C254 and C255), adding extravagant scroll handles on the sides. Duplessis may have been inspired by the design for an ecclesiastical hanging lamp by Pierre Germain II. Published in 1748, it features similar handles and foliate suspension chains reminiscent of the myrtle branches.
    Although their exuberant decoration clearly make these vases a creation of the rococo, the painted Greek-key pattern on the feet also mark the beginning fashion for neo-classical elements in Sèvres designs.